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Cloud technologies help corporations achieve carbon neutrality

Learn how to build, report, and ultimately comply with standards and mandates that track carbon neutrality and achievements toward sustainability.

In partnership withInfosys

The past two years of pandemic-related challenges have accelerated the adoption of cloud across industry at an unprecedented rate. This increased investment in cloud can serve to reinvigorate sustainability goals and provide the ability to measure the impact of an investment. The consequences of climate change are no longer theoretical, and corporate leaders are taking responsibility. While many corporations agree on the imperative to change, sifting through the noise to identify a path to achieve neutrality is complicated.

MIT Technology Review recently sat down with experts from Infosys and Microsoft—Corey Glickman, partner and global head of sustainability and design consulting services at technology giant Infosys, and Matt Hellman, the US sustainability strategy leader at Microsoft—to discuss mandates, tools, timelines, and more from their journeys to achieve carbon neutrality.

Access the full webcast here.

This content was produced by Insights, the custom content arm of MIT Technology Review. It was not written by MIT Technology Review’s editorial staff.

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