Skip to Content
Climate change

How China rules clean tech, in charts

You want climate progress? China holds all the cards.
August 19, 2020

China has transformed itself into a clean-energy powerhouse that now produces most of the world’s solar panels, wind turbines, electric vehicles, and lithium-ion batteries. 

Market dominance, manufacturing expertise, and established supply chains give China huge leverage over the global clean-energy sector. It could enable the country to dictate technical standards and terms of trade, while seizing most of the jobs and revenue that arise from the shift away from fossil fuels.

Other nations hope to build up their own clean-tech manufacturing capacity to reduce their reliance on other countries and boost domestic jobs. But China’s market share, and the nearly two decades it took to build it, means any country that hopes to rapidly shift away from fossil fuels will still need to find ways to successfully collaborate and trade with that nation.


51%: China’s share of EV sales
54%: China’s share of wind turbine assembly capacity
75%: China’s share of global lithium-ion cell manufacturing


Deep Dive

Climate change

This CRISPR pioneer wants to capture more carbon with crops

New research at Jennifer Doudna's institute aims to create faster-growing, carbon-hungry plants using the gene-editing tool.

giant kelp underwater
giant kelp underwater

Running Tide is facing scientist departures and growing concerns over seaweed sinking for carbon removal

The venture-backed startup believes kelp could be a powerful tool to combat climate change. But some scientists fear the ecological risks on large scales.

The future of urban housing is energy-efficient refrigerators

Adapting old, energy-inefficient buildings is less sexy but far greener than many high-tech solutions.

Stay connected

Illustration by Rose WongIllustration by Rose Wong

Get the latest updates from
MIT Technology Review

Discover special offers, top stories, upcoming events, and more.

Thank you for submitting your email!

Explore more newsletters

It looks like something went wrong.

We’re having trouble saving your preferences. Try refreshing this page and updating them one more time. If you continue to get this message, reach out to us at customer-service@technologyreview.com with a list of newsletters you’d like to receive.