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Tech policy

How to submit a change to the Covid Tracing Tracker project

For our Covid Tracing Tracker project, we are sifting files, documents, and interviewing sources to monitor the status of automated contact tracing apps all around the world. But we’re also asking for your help to make the database better and more accurate. There are many countries worldwide, documentation and information in many languages, and a wide variation in the apps and services to automate the contact tracing process.

So, if you see something in our existing data set that you can improve on, we want you to tell us about it.

If you have an update, correction, or addition to the tracker, please email the relevant information to us at CTT@technologyreview.com. Please reference original sources for your claim: government or developer announcements, verifiable news sources, or published research.

What we’re looking for

Up-to-date information on automated contact tracing apps that are backed by national governments. We plan to add significant state-level initiatives as our database evolves. 

Data could include answers to our basic questions—What country does it operate in? What is it called? Who is producing it? Is it released yet? Where will it be available, and on what platforms? What technologies does it use? How many people have downloaded it?

Or it could be specific documentation that gives insight into our list of privacy principles: Is the app voluntary? Are there limits on what data is collected and how it is shared? Will the data be destroyed in 30 days or less? And are policies publicly available or the code open sourced?

Links to documents, web pages, announcements along with details of how this information applies are greatly appreciated.

What we’re not looking for

For now we’re focused purely on automated contact tracing apps, not APIs or other protocols, self-reporting tools, or informational websites, apps or services. We are also not looking for information on manual contact tracing efforts.

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