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How the US might reopen the economy and what we can learn from China

We talked to a professor on Chinese economics about how truly interdependent the global economy is.
April 15, 2020

Note: This episode has ended.

In this episode of Radio Corona, Gideon Lichfield, editor in chief of MIT Technology Review, spoke with Nelson Mark, economics professor at the University of Notre Dame, about the economic impact of covid-19, how we should think about pandemics as economic risks, and how the US should be thinking about its economy as it compares to China's.

Mark is an expert in the macroeconomics of China, a research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER), and the North American editor of the Pacific Economic Review. With states like California already starting to make tentative plans for reopening as soon as May, we asked Mark what the US can learn from China, where the city of Wuhan came out of 76 days of strict lockdown only earlier this month.

This episode was recorded on April 16, 2020. You can watch it below.

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