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Solving bias

February 5, 2020
Man on stage at EmTech Digital
Man on stage at EmTech Digital

Bias is to AI as rust is to steel. It corrupts decisions, leaving us unsure of the integrity of our systems. Lurking within data and algorithms, these hidden prejudices skew AI results in unexpected and undesired directions. Next month in San Francisco, EmTech Digital explores the practical approaches to addressing bias in algorithms and data. 

Building ethical artificial intelligence is an enormously complex task because bias is in the eye of the beholder. Is an AI-based college admission system that considers gender and geography to balance the pool of accepted applicants more or less biased than one that does not? While we can probably agree that a balanced system is better, who has the authority to make these decisions

Artificial intelligence has given us algorithms capable of recognizing faces, diagnosing diseases, and, of course, crushing computer games. But even the smartest algorithms can sometimes behave in unexpected and unwanted ways. How can we prevent aberrant behavior in machine learning as the technology moves out of research labs and into the real world?

Join us next month to explore these topics and more at EmTech Digital.

Purchase your ticket now.

Deep Dive

Artificial intelligence

Why Meta’s latest large language model survived only three days online

Galactica was supposed to help scientists. Instead, it mindlessly spat out biased and incorrect nonsense.

DeepMind’s game-playing AI has beaten a 50-year-old record in computer science

The new version of AlphaZero discovered a faster way to do matrix multiplication, a core problem in computing that affects thousands of everyday computer tasks.

A bot that watched 70,000 hours of Minecraft could unlock AI’s next big thing

Online videos are a vast and untapped source of training data—and OpenAI says it has a new way to use it.

Google’s new AI can hear a snippet of song—and then keep on playing

The technique, called AudioLM, generates naturalistic sounds without the need for human annotation.

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Illustration by Rose Wong

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