Skip to Content
Space

An Iranian missile took down the Ukrainian passenger jet, claim US officials

January 10, 2020
Iran plane crash
Iran plane crashAP

The news: The Ukrainian passenger jet that crashed shortly after takeoff from Iran’s capital on Wednesday was brought down by an Iranian surface-to-air missile, according to US and Canadian intelligence officials. The crash killed all 176 people on board.  

The evidence: US officials said they had detected an anti-aircraft missile battery locking onto the plane, followed by an infrared heat signal from two missiles being launched, and then an explosion on the plane. Canada, where 63 of the victims came from, said it had intelligence from multiple sources to support the US’s findings. A video that the New York Times says it has verified appears to be consistent with this version of events. Canada’s prime minister, Justin Trudeau, said it was most likely an accident.

The timing: The plane crashed when Iran’s military was doubtless on high alert for a possible retaliation by the US, just hours after Iran fired missiles at American targets in the US. The Iranian government has strongly denied the claims, and accused the US of spreading misinformation.

Sign up here to our daily newsletter The Download to get your dose of the latest must-read news from the world of emerging tech. 

Keep Reading

Most Popular

This startup wants to copy you into an embryo for organ harvesting

With plans to create realistic synthetic embryos, grown in jars, Renewal Bio is on a journey to the horizon of science and ethics.

VR is as good as psychedelics at helping people reach transcendence

On key metrics, a VR experience elicited a response indistinguishable from subjects who took medium doses of LSD or magic mushrooms.

This nanoparticle could be the key to a universal covid vaccine

Ending the covid pandemic might well require a vaccine that protects against any new strains. Researchers may have found a strategy that will work.

Stay connected

Illustration by Rose Wong

Get the latest updates from
MIT Technology Review

Discover special offers, top stories, upcoming events, and more.

Thank you for submitting your email!

Explore more newsletters

It looks like something went wrong.

We’re having trouble saving your preferences. Try refreshing this page and updating them one more time. If you continue to get this message, reach out to us at customer-service@technologyreview.com with a list of newsletters you’d like to receive.