Skip to Content
Profiles in generosity

Jim Champy ’63, SM ’65, and Lois Champy, MArch ’71

Boston, Massachusetts
August 21, 2019
v
v

Jim and Lois Champy have both had active careers—he as a business consultant and author known for his work in business process engineering, she as an architect with her own firm. Over the years, they’ve maintained a strong relationship with MIT through giving and service.

Value in volunteering. “MIT’s effect on my life hasn’t only come from the educational experience,” says Jim, a life member emeritus of the MIT Corporation. “The lessons I continue to learn from working with MIT alumni, faculty, and administrators have shaped the way I think about my own purpose and goals in life.” Lois agrees: “The MIT community is amazing, but very humble—and willing to share their time.”

Growing support. “Our objective was for our giving to increase over time, but we also knew MIT would manage the funds very well,” says Jim. Their endowed scholarship fund, started in 1989, now supports about eight students annually. “Each year, we’re struck by the students’ aspirations and accomplishments,” he says. “It brings us a great deal of satisfaction to know that we’ve been able to help them in some way.”

A different level. “MIT is an accelerator of good work, especially relating to the environment and the development of basic science,” Lois says. “The access and the opportunity students receive is at a different level—it opens doors to people, research, and ideas that you won’t find anywhere else.”

Help MIT build a better world.

For more information, contact
David Woodruff:

617.253.3990; daw@mit.edu.

Or visit giving.mit.edu

Keep Reading

Most Popular

This startup wants to copy you into an embryo for organ harvesting

With plans to create realistic synthetic embryos, grown in jars, Renewal Bio is on a journey to the horizon of science and ethics.

VR is as good as psychedelics at helping people reach transcendence

On key metrics, a VR experience elicited a response indistinguishable from subjects who took medium doses of LSD or magic mushrooms.

This nanoparticle could be the key to a universal covid vaccine

Ending the covid pandemic might well require a vaccine that protects against any new strains. Researchers may have found a strategy that will work.

Stay connected

Illustration by Rose Wong

Get the latest updates from
MIT Technology Review

Discover special offers, top stories, upcoming events, and more.

Thank you for submitting your email!

Explore more newsletters

It looks like something went wrong.

We’re having trouble saving your preferences. Try refreshing this page and updating them one more time. If you continue to get this message, reach out to us at customer-service@technologyreview.com with a list of newsletters you’d like to receive.