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Our best illustrations of 2018

Our artists’ thought-provoking, playful creations bring our stories to life, often saying more with an image than words ever could.
December 26, 2018

From the MIT Technology Review art team, here are some of our very favorite illustrations of the year:

Two sick children and a $1.5 million bill: One family’s race for a gene therapy cure
Illustration by Sébastien Thibault
Google and Others Are Building AI Systems That Doubt Themselves
Illustration by Saiman Chow
Noon in the antilibrary
Illustration by Rob Sheridan
Dueling Neural Networks
Illustration by Derek Brahney | Diagram courtesy of Michael Nielsen, “Neural networks and deep learning”, determination press, 2015
China’s use of big data might actually make it less Big Brother-ish
Illustration by Magoz
The Reunion: a new science-fiction story about surveillance in China
Illustration by George Wylesol
How Google took on China—and lost
Illustration by Stuart Bradford
Five Jobs That Are Set to Grow in 2018
Illustration by Nick Little
Should a self-driving car kill the baby or the grandma? Depends on where you’re from.
Illustration by Simon Landrein
In the World of Cryptocurrencies, Something’s Gotta Give in 2018
Illustration by Niv Bavarsky
Your next doctor’s appointment might be with an AI
Illustration by Nicole Ginelli
Facebook’s app for kids should freak parents out
Illustration by Daniel Zender
Let’s destroy Bitcoin
Illustration by Ariel Davis
The economy issue
Illustration by Noma Bar
Your genome, on demand
Illustration by Nico Ortega
Why we can’t quit the QWERTY keyboard
Illustration by Evan Cohen

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