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Europe’s proposed law could require streaming services to hit local content quotas

September 5, 2018

Netflix, Hulu, and their competitors operating in the EU would be required to count European productions as at least 30 percent of their content.

The news: The legislation, which will be voted on in October, would mean streaming platforms would be forced to invest more money in Europe to create new shows and movies. “We just need the final vote, but it’s a mere formality,” Roberto Viola, head of the European Commission department that regulates communications networks, content, and technology, told Variety.

Is that a big change? Some platforms would be affected more than others. Netflix is already close to the 30 percent mark. The law would force other platforms to match that number, and ensure that tech companies create future content in EU countries.

The regulation continues: This is the latest episode in Europe’s recent push to influence American tech companies. From GDPR to fines on Google, the continent’s regulators continue to show they are not afraid to ask for what they want from tech companies and set what they think should be the standard.

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