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Facts about first-years. Everything you need to know about the Class of 2022.

From its laid-back hackers to its rigorous academics, MIT can be a bewildering place for the uninitiated. From 1925 to the 1940s, a multi-day “Freshman Camp” was held at Lake Massapoag, featuring talks, sports, and traditions like dunking the sophomore class president. Today, first-years learn about campus culture during Orientation/Residence Exploration (REX) week. Find out a bit more about the Class of 2022 and the experiences of previous generations with this compilation of first-year facts. 

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Illustration of male/female icons. Text reads:
21,706 applied to the class of 2022. 1,464 were accepted. 1,122 first years enrolled as of July 15.
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Text reads: Kevin, Daniel, and Emily: The most popular names in the Class  of 2022.
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Photo of students participating in a water balloon fight in front of the MIT dome. Text reads: 3000 - Estimated number of water balloons thrown at the 2017 REX water war between East and West Campus.
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Illustration of striped tie. Text reads: In the late 1920s, first-years had to wear neckties in the school colors at all times. When the practice was abolished in 1931, students held a tie funeral.

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