Skip to Content
Artificial intelligence

Americans really don’t trust self-driving cars

In a survey conducted shortly after Uber’s deadly self-driving-car accident in March, the American Automobile Association (AAA) found that 73 percent of Americans would be afraid to ride in autonomous vehicles, up from 63 percent in late 2017.

Generation gaps: The biggest decline in trust came from millennials, with 64 percent saying they wouldn’t ride in a self-driving car, up from 49 percent. But older generations were still more fearful: 71 percent of Baby Boomers and 68 percent of Gen Xers say they wouldn’t feel safe in them.

But: Despite the apprehension, more than half of surveyed drivers want semi-autonomous technology in their next vehicle.

Why it matters: More than 30,000 Americans die in traffic accidents every year. Self-driving cars have the potential to bring that number way down, but people need to want to ride in them first.

Deep Dive

Artificial intelligence

What does GPT-3 “know” about me? 

Large language models are trained on troves of personal data hoovered from the internet. So I wanted to know: What does it have on me?

An AI that can design new proteins could help unlock new cures and materials 

The machine-learning tool could help researchers discover entirely new proteins not yet known to science.

DeepMind’s new chatbot uses Google searches plus humans to give better answers

The lab trained a chatbot to learn from human feedback and search the internet for information to support its claims.

Stay connected

Illustration by Rose Wong

Get the latest updates from
MIT Technology Review

Discover special offers, top stories, upcoming events, and more.

Thank you for submitting your email!

Explore more newsletters

It looks like something went wrong.

We’re having trouble saving your preferences. Try refreshing this page and updating them one more time. If you continue to get this message, reach out to us at customer-service@technologyreview.com with a list of newsletters you’d like to receive.