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MIT Technology Review

Americans really don’t trust self-driving cars

In a survey conducted shortly after Uber’s deadly self-driving-car accident in March, the American Automobile Association (AAA) found that 73 percent of Americans would be afraid to ride in autonomous vehicles, up from 63 percent in late 2017.

Generation gaps: The biggest decline in trust came from millennials, with 64 percent saying they wouldn’t ride in a self-driving car, up from 49 percent. But older generations were still more fearful: 71 percent of Baby Boomers and 68 percent of Gen Xers say they wouldn’t feel safe in them.

But: Despite the apprehension, more than half of surveyed drivers want semi-autonomous technology in their next vehicle.

Why it matters: More than 30,000 Americans die in traffic accidents every year. Self-driving cars have the potential to bring that number way down, but people need to want to ride in them first.