Skip to Content
Silicon Valley

Amazon’s HQ2 could price lower-income workers out of its chosen city

A new report by Indeed.com has found that rising housing prices in cities are pushing out whole classes of workers.

For example: There are 77 percent fewer people holding jobs as trailer mechanics and 67 percent fewer as concrete finishers in expensive urban areas. In general, people with lower-paying careers were vastly underrepresented, as they simply can’t afford the sky-high rents.

Here comes HQ2: Boston is on Amazon’s short list for its second headquarters, but the prospect of 50,000 Amazon employees house-hunting in an already-strained housing market could be disastrous. Other cities on the list are likely to face similar problems if selected.

Why it matters: Even more low-income workers stand to get priced out. To prevent this, cities may be forced to implement drastic measures to ensure access to housing—like the “Amazon tax” Seattle just passed.

Keep Reading

Most Popular

It’s time to retire the term “user”

The proliferation of AI means we need a new word.

Sam Altman says helpful agents are poised to become AI’s killer function

Open AI’s CEO says we won’t need new hardware or lots more training data to get there.

An AI startup made a hyperrealistic deepfake of me that’s so good it’s scary

Synthesia's new technology is impressive but raises big questions about a world where we increasingly can’t tell what’s real.

Taking AI to the next level in manufacturing

Reducing data, talent, and organizational barriers to achieve scale.

Stay connected

Illustration by Rose Wong

Get the latest updates from
MIT Technology Review

Discover special offers, top stories, upcoming events, and more.

Thank you for submitting your email!

Explore more newsletters

It looks like something went wrong.

We’re having trouble saving your preferences. Try refreshing this page and updating them one more time. If you continue to get this message, reach out to us at customer-service@technologyreview.com with a list of newsletters you’d like to receive.