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Microsoft’s new video game controller is making gaming more accessible

The company has announced the release of a mass-produced game controller designed for people with disabilities.

Some background: While some independent companies have created game controllers targeted at this demographic, the Xbox Adaptive Controller will be the first one released by the actual creator of a major console. It will be available for purchase later this year and is compatible with games played on XBox One and Windows 10.

How it works: The key is adaptability. Because standard game controllers require a significant level of dexterity to manipulate, the devices can be limiting to people without perfect control of their hands. The adaptive controller’s programmable buttons and 19 inputs allow various buttons, switches, and levers to be modified to suit a user’s mobility. 

Why it matters: There are more than 33 million gamers in North America with disabilities. This is the latest step in embracing these players and welcoming them into the gaming community.

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