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Sprint and T-Mobile are all about 5G—or so they say

April 30, 2018

The long-sought corporate fusion will shake up the mobile telecoms landscape in the US—if Washington lets it happen, that is.

And then there were three: T-Mobile CEO John Legere announced the move via Twitter on Sunday. The new company (which will keep the T-Mobile name) will compete against AT&T and Verizon for dominance in the wireless market.

Some background: Sprint and T-Mobile have tried this before. The first go-round failed in 2014 after pushback from regulators in the Obama administration. Attempt #2 fell apart last year because the two sides couldn’t agree on how the new company’s leadership should look.

Why now? Two words: 5G and Trump. By combining forces, the new T-Mobile aims to be the first company to bring widespread 5G wireless to consumers. But while the alliance could indeed be beneficial to efforts to build a new network, heralding 5G is likely more about pandering to the Trump administration’s worries that China could beat the US to 5G. And with Trump seen as more open to large corporate mergers, the two companies are hoping that this time regulators will let it happen.

Deep Dive

Smart cities

Rendering of Waterfront Toronto project
Rendering of Waterfront Toronto project

Toronto wants to kill the smart city forever

The city wants to get right what Sidewalk Labs got so wrong.

AV2.0 autonomous vehicles adapt to unknown road conditions concept
AV2.0 autonomous vehicles adapt to unknown road conditions concept

The big new idea for making self-driving cars that can go anywhere

The mainstream approach to driverless cars is slow and difficult. These startups think going all-in on AI will get there faster.

Terminal bi-articulated bus in Curitiba Brazil
Terminal bi-articulated bus in Curitiba Brazil

We need smarter cities, not “smart cities”

A singular focus on high-tech will dilute the vibrancy of our cities and limit their potential.

Marseilles surveillance cameras
Marseilles surveillance cameras

Marseille’s battle against the surveillance state

The boisterous, rebellious port city is trying to fight the growing ubiquity of policing cameras.

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Illustration by Rose WongIllustration by Rose Wong

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