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A robotic camera system films sports like a human

March 28, 2018

New AI software can move and focus a camera to frame shots that look incredibly natural for viewers.

How it works: A robotic camera system, called Polycam Player and made by Nikon company MRMC, uses image recognition to track players on the field. Instead of panning and scanning footage from wide angles like most automated camera systems, it tracks and frames players in tighter shots as a human would.

Getting the impossible angle: Instead of replacing human operators, the system is designed to capture views that humans might miss—of distant action, say, or in unexpected corners of the field—to give broadcasters more shots. That could be especially useful to smaller media outlets working with limited staff.

Off the field: Camera tracking solutions are also entering broadcast studios and even the hands of consumers. Earlier this year Skydio released a consumer drone camera that can dodge obstacles and follow you to get the perfect shot.

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