Skip to Content
Biotechnology and health

Genes of human “mutants” point to a new superpower

DNA search finds people resistant to liver disease. Can we mimic the effect with a drug?
Regeneron Pharmaceuticals

The search for mutations that conjure medical superpowers has turned up people who are resistant to liver disease, even if they drink like crazy.

Big-time biotech company Regeneron Pharmaceuticals says it found people with a gene mutation that seems to leave them mostly immune to “fatty liver” disease, which is widespread in the US as a result of both alcoholism and overeating.

Now, the company says, it will partner with gene-silencing specialist Alnylam Pharmaceuticals to create medicines that mimic the effect.

Regeneron runs one of the world’s largest gene-sequencing operations in partnership with the Geisinger Health System, operator of a large hospital network.

It has the DNA code and the medical records of thousands of volunteers.

That allows the company to search for people unusually resistant to certain diseases and then determine if there’s an explanation in their DNA (see “The search for exceptional genomes”).

The search for genetic superpowers can lead quickly to new drugs, such as a powerful cholesterol-lowering medicine already being sold by Regeneron.

This time, Regeneron scoured the DNA, blood levels, and electronic records of 46,544 volunteers to look for links to liver damage.

They zeroed in on a gene called HSD17B13. They found that folks who lack a working copy of this gene had a 73 percent lower chance of cirrhosis due to drinking, and half as big a chance of other types of cirrhosis.

How the protective effect works isn’t entirely clear. But the two biotech companies say they will now try to create a drug to treat fatty-liver disease.

About a quarter of Americans suffer from the condition, according to a report published by the Regeneron scientists in the New England Journal of Medicine on March 21.

Fatty liver is chronic and not always dangerous. The biotech companies say they are looking to treat a specific type called nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, or NASH, which is more likely to lead to liver failure.

The liver problem is linked to being overweight, so losing weight can slow it down. For those who can’t shed the pounds, Regeneron may eventually have a superpower in a vial.

Deep Dive

Biotechnology and health

Scientists are finding signals of long covid in blood. They could lead to new treatments.

Faults in a certain part of the immune system might be at the root of some long covid cases, new research suggests.

This baby with a head camera helped teach an AI how kids learn language

A neural network trained on the experiences of a single young child managed to learn one of the core components of language: how to match words to the objects they represent.

The first gene-editing treatment: 10 Breakthrough Technologies 2024

Sickle-cell disease is the first illness to be beaten by CRISPR, but the new treatment comes with an expected price tag of $2 to $3 million.

We’ve never understood how hunger works. That might be about to change.

Scientists have spent decades trying to unravel the intricate mysteries of the human appetite. Are they on the verge of finally determining how this basic drive functions?

Stay connected

Illustration by Rose Wong

Get the latest updates from
MIT Technology Review

Discover special offers, top stories, upcoming events, and more.

Thank you for submitting your email!

Explore more newsletters

It looks like something went wrong.

We’re having trouble saving your preferences. Try refreshing this page and updating them one more time. If you continue to get this message, reach out to us at customer-service@technologyreview.com with a list of newsletters you’d like to receive.