Skip to Content
Climate change

The Netherlands is building the world’s first subsidy-free offshore wind farms

Part of the nation’s big push to quickly build out clean-energy systems, they will be built in the North Sea by 2022.

The news:  Climate Action reports that the Dutch government awarded contracts to Swedish energy firm Vattenfall to build two wind farms in the North Sea. The power they create will be sold on the open market and not subsidized by public funds.

But: It’s worth noting that the government will absorb some costs for the facility, such as the expense of connecting the farms to the grid, according to the Maritime Executive.

Details: Each wind farm will sit about 14 miles off the Dutch coast and generate around 350 megawatts. Together, they will provide enough energy to power 1.5 million homes.

Bigger picture: The Netherlands has been doubling down on investment in clean energy recently. That’s because a review in 2017 found it wasn’t on track to meet targets in a European agreement demanding that it produce 14 percent of its energy from renewables by 2020.

Deep Dive

Climate change

China’s heat wave is creating havoc for electric vehicle drivers

The country is a leader in EV adoption, but extreme weather is exposing weaknesses in its charging infrastructure.

We must fundamentally rethink “net-zero” climate plans. Here are six ways.

Corporate climate plans are too often a mix of fuzzy math, flawed assumptions, and wishful thinking.

This is what’s keeping electric planes from taking off

Batteries could power planes, but weight will limit how far they fly.

The US agency in charge of developing fossil fuels has a new job: cleaning them up

The Office of Fossil Energy and Carbon Management has a new name, new leaders, and a new mandate to meet Joe Biden’s climate goals.

Stay connected

Illustration by Rose Wong

Get the latest updates from
MIT Technology Review

Discover special offers, top stories, upcoming events, and more.

Thank you for submitting your email!

Explore more newsletters

It looks like something went wrong.

We’re having trouble saving your preferences. Try refreshing this page and updating them one more time. If you continue to get this message, reach out to us at customer-service@technologyreview.com with a list of newsletters you’d like to receive.