Skip to Content
Computing

California’s dreaming of having America’s toughest net neutrality regime

March 15, 2018

A draft state law would be even stricter than federal rules that it aims to replace.

The news: Ars Technica says Scott Weiner, a California state senator, and other local politicians have introduced a revised bill to create a net neutrality law for the state. It would impose stiffer restrictions than the national one being scrapped by the Federal Communications Commission.

Details: The draft law mimics the federal rules, forbidding internet service providers from blocking or throttling web traffic. But it also goes further, banning “zero-rating”—a practice that lets companies pay ISPs to have their applications exempted from user data caps.

Mixed reactions: The proposed legislation is winning support from consumer advocacy groups that lobbied against the FCC’s plans to abandon net neutrality rules. But the agency has said it will mount a legal challenge against states that try to replicate the rules it’s ditching.

Why it matters: Several states, including Washington, have already passed their own net neutrality laws. Plenty of others are thinking of doing so, too, and California’s proposed move could influence them.

Deep Dive

Computing

A chip design that changes everything: 10 Breakthrough Technologies 2023

Computer chip designs are expensive and hard to license. That’s all about to change thanks to the popular open standard known as RISC-V.

Modern data architectures fuel innovation

More diverse data estates require a new strategy—and the infrastructure to support it.

Chinese chips will keep powering your everyday life

The war over advanced semiconductor technology continues, but China will likely take a more important role in manufacturing legacy chips for common devices.

The computer scientist who hunts for costly bugs in crypto code

Programming errors on the blockchain can mean $100 million lost in the blink of an eye. Ronghui Gu and his company CertiK are trying to help.

Stay connected

Illustration by Rose Wong

Get the latest updates from
MIT Technology Review

Discover special offers, top stories, upcoming events, and more.

Thank you for submitting your email!

Explore more newsletters

It looks like something went wrong.

We’re having trouble saving your preferences. Try refreshing this page and updating them one more time. If you continue to get this message, reach out to us at customer-service@technologyreview.com with a list of newsletters you’d like to receive.