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Washington is the first state to pass its own net neutrality laws

New rules mean internet service providers won’t be able to slow or block content in the state—but federal laws might yet trump them.

Backstory: Late last year, the Federal Communications Commission voted to reverse Obama-era rules that sought to democratize the internet. People have since been (rightlyclamoring to resurrect them.

The news: Washington governor Jay Inslee signed into law rules banning ISPs from blocking content, throttling traffic, or accepting payment for prioritization. They go into effect June 6. “We know that when DC fails to act, Washington state has to do so,” Inslee said.

Plus: There are 25 states planning similar legislation. The AP notes that Oregon already passed a law banning state agencies from using internet providers that block or prioritize traffic starting in 2019.

But: As the Verge notes, the FCC actually decided to prohibit states from introducing their own laws like this. It’s likely ISPs will sue Washington state to find out if that works.

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Illustration by Rose Wong

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