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You can apply to your next job on Facebook

February 28, 2018

The social network aims to take friction out of finding work by letting people all over the world submit job applications on its pages.

The news: Facebook says that starting today, people in 40 countries will be able to seek work—or employees—on a new part of the network it calls (wait for it) Jobs. It’s aimed at smaller, local businesses that might be looking for, say, retail assistants or restaurant waiters.

Seeking work: People sift through roles in the Jobs marketplace or are notified of them via alerts. Applications can be auto-filled from someone’s profile, or people can edit them before submitting. Facebook says recruiters only see an applicant’s public profile.

Finding staff: Recruiters post jobs on the site. This is where Facebook can make money: Gaurav Dosi, its Jobs manager, says that companies can pay to boost ads so that they appear on people’s news feeds.

IM interviews: If an employer is interested, prepare for a new twist on the job hunt: chatting via Messenger with a prospective boss to check in about details, arrange interviews, or whatever. Some conversations could result in employment.

And … is Facebook using it to find talent? Dosi says it plans to, in the near future.

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