Skip to Content
Artificial intelligence

This AI software dreams up new designs for 3-D-printed parts before your eyes

February 6, 2018

Desktop Metal’s new software lets regular people design objects optimized for 3-D printing, no experience required.

The news:  Desktop Metal’s new LiveParts is a piece of software that automatically generates designs of objects ready for 3-D printing. Users just tell it the structural constraints of the object they’re building, and it uses biology-inspired AI models to quickly generate a design suited to additive manufacturing.

Better components: The software ensures that parts take advantage of 3-D printing’s capabilities. “This would enable weight reductions between 25 and 60 percent of many kinds of general-purpose parts,” says Desktop Metal CEO Ric Fulop, “while spreading loads more evenly and improving fatigue resistance.”

3-D printing for the masses? Desktop Metal says the software is easy to use even if you have no experience designing parts for additive manufacturing. That could help move 3-D printing closer to being able to create whatever you need, whenever you need it—no engineering degree required.

Deep Dive

Artificial intelligence

How to opt out of Meta’s AI training

Your posts are a gold mine, especially as companies start to run out of AI training data.

Why does AI hallucinate?

The tendency to make things up is holding chatbots back. But that’s just what they do.

Apple is promising personalized AI in a private cloud. Here’s how that will work.

Apple’s first big salvo in the AI wars makes a bet that people will care about data privacy when automating tasks.

This AI-powered “black box” could make surgery safer

A new smart monitoring system could help doctors avoid mistakes—but it’s also alarming some surgeons and leading to sabotage.

Stay connected

Illustration by Rose Wong

Get the latest updates from
MIT Technology Review

Discover special offers, top stories, upcoming events, and more.

Thank you for submitting your email!

Explore more newsletters

It looks like something went wrong.

We’re having trouble saving your preferences. Try refreshing this page and updating them one more time. If you continue to get this message, reach out to us at customer-service@technologyreview.com with a list of newsletters you’d like to receive.