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Profiles in generosity

David Tweed ’66

Melbourne, Florida
December 20, 2016

As an electrical engineering major at MIT, David Tweed turned to music as the perfect complement to the rigor of his studies. “MIT was challenging, but being a part of the orchestra and the concert band kept me grounded,” says Tweed, who plays the flute, clarinet, and saxophone. He strongly believes that exposure to the arts is important for a well-rounded life. With this in mind, he is giving back to help MIT students find a balance between their creative and technical sides.

After graduating, Tweed started working for the MIT Instrumentation Lab (now Draper Lab), where he gained useful experience in business operations. He then switched gears and worked on startups for the rest of his career. But Tweed’s goal was always to get back to music, which he had put aside for 27 years to focus on work. Upon retirement, he joined a community band and was then recruited by the International Flute Orchestra. He currently enjoys touring with the group as a semi-pro musician.

Looking back at his time at MIT, Tweed decided to give back to students who understand the value of a performing-arts education. His scholarship benefits students concentrating on performing arts, as well as first-generation students. “I’m happy to be in a position where I can help someone who otherwise might not have access to a first-class education at MIT,” Tweed says. He is also providing support for the student-organized MIT Concert Band.

Please consider your own gift to MIT.
For information, contact David Woodruff:
617-253-3990; daw@mit.edu.
Or visit giving.mit.edu.

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