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Seven Must-Read Stories (Week Ending July 2, 2016)

Another chance to catch the most interesting, and important, articles from the previous week on MIT Technology Review.
July 1, 2016
  1. Wind Fuels the North Sea’s Next Energy Boom
    As oil declines, huge wind farms are providing electricity to Northern Europe.
  2. Fatal Tesla Autopilot Crash Is a Reminder Autonomous Cars Will Sometimes Screw Up
    A death behind the wheel with Tesla’s Autopilot on raises the question of how safe automated cars must be.
  3. How EnChroma’s Glasses Correct Color-Blindness
    People with red-green color-blindness can suddenly discriminate between colors they couldn’t see before.
  4. The Rocket Fuel for Biden’s “Cancer Moonshot”? Big Data
    The National Cancer Institute hopes a new data-sharing agreement with Foundation Medicine is the first of many.
  5. Funding of Space Ventures Gets a Lift
    Extraterrestrial ventures are no longer limited to deep-pocketed tycoons.
  6. This App Knows Just the Right Emoji for Any Occasion
    Having trouble finding the perfect emoji to express yourself?
  7. Clinics Offering Unproven Stem Cell Therapies Are Proliferating Across the U.S.
    Patients don’t need “stem cell tourism” anymore—ineffective and potentially dangerous interventions abound at home.

 

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