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Profiles in generosity

Adrianna Ma ’95, MEng ’96

San Francisco, California
June 21, 2016

Adrianna Ma came to MIT to study engineering, but in the process she learned a new way to learn. From day one, she realized that she would have to up her game to rise to the level of her classmates. Ever fearless, Ma jumped in. With the help of her professors, teaching assistants, and classmates, she was emboldened to tackle the kinds of problems that she would never have even considered. “I’m grateful to MIT because it gave me the confidence to go forward in life and confront any challenge with critical thinking and reasoning,” she says. This is what motivates Ma to give back to MIT.

After graduation, Ma explored a career in engineering in Silicon Valley. She eventually switched gears and entered the financial industry in New York City. She credits MIT with giving her the tools to excel in her new field: “The reason I succeeded in finance is because I’m a good engineer. I can solve problems, which is an incredibly empowering experience.”

Ma remains connected to MIT and sees the Institute as a lifelong partner in both her professional and personal journeys. “I believe that giving should be part of living and shouldn’t be saved up for one moment in your life,” she explains. “When I’m back on campus, the nostalgia of it reminds me of where I came from, and the content of the Institute keeps me sharp on where the world is headed.”

Please consider your own gift to MIT.
For information, contact David Woodruff: 617-253-3990; daw@mit.edu. Or visit giving.mit.edu.

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