Skip to Content

U.S. Government Wants to Jump-Start Next-Generation Nuclear Reactors

The Department of Energy’s $82 million in funding is a small step in commercializing advanced reactors, and much more is needed.

Attempting to jump-start technology that could provide abundant, zero-carbon energy, the Department of Energy just announced $82 million in funding for advanced nuclear reactor research and development. A total of 93 projects will receive funding “that will help push innovative nuclear technologies toward commercialization and into the market,” the department said in a statement.

It’s not a ton of money, considering that developing new reactor technology will cost billions. But it’s the most tangible sign yet of U.S. support for advanced nuclear technology being developed on American soil. About $7 million in funding and technical assistance will come under the Gateway for Accelerated Innovation in Nuclear initiative, which is designed to streamline the process for private companies to win approval from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission for new reactors. The lengthy and expensive NRC licensing process has caused several new nuclear startups to look overseas to license and build their reactors. The companies receiving GAIN awards include GE Hitachi, Westinghouse, Terrestrial Energy USA, and Transatomic Power Corporation. Terrestrial Energy has also received a grant from the Canadian government to build a prototype of its integral molten salt reactor.

Nearly half the money will go to universities to fund basic research on the challenges around developing new nuclear technology, including materials science, nuclear waste disposal, advanced manufacturing techniques, and fuel fabrication.

This week’s announcement is important, but it’s not nearly enough to bring new nuclear plants online in time to limit climate change. The International Energy Agency says that global nuclear capacity needs to more than double, to 930 gigawatts, by midcentury in order to play a significant role in limiting global warming.

While countries such as China and India have embarked on major nuclear plant construction programs, most new plants are based on conventional technology that was developed in the 1970s. Such plants have long been plagued with cost overruns, public opposition, and safety concerns. A new generation of nuclear reactors could address those problems. This week’s funding marks a small first step in developing and commercializing those reactors.

(Read more: “White House Strikes a Blow for Advanced Nuclear Reactors”)

Keep Reading

Most Popular

Europe's AI Act concept
Europe's AI Act concept

A quick guide to the most important AI law you’ve never heard of

The European Union is planning new legislation aimed at curbing the worst harms associated with artificial intelligence.

supermassive black hole at center of Milky Way
supermassive black hole at center of Milky Way

This is the first image of the black hole at the center of our galaxy

The stunning image was made possible by linking eight existing radio observatories across the globe.

Uber Autonomous Vehicles parked in a lot
Uber Autonomous Vehicles parked in a lot

It will soon be easy for self-driving cars to hide in plain sight. We shouldn’t let them.

If they ever hit our roads for real, other drivers need to know exactly what they are.

transplant surgery
transplant surgery

The gene-edited pig heart given to a dying patient was infected with a pig virus

The first transplant of a genetically-modified pig heart into a human may have ended prematurely because of a well-known—and avoidable—risk.

Stay connected

Illustration by Rose WongIllustration by Rose Wong

Get the latest updates from
MIT Technology Review

Discover special offers, top stories, upcoming events, and more.

Thank you for submitting your email!

Explore more newsletters

It looks like something went wrong.

We’re having trouble saving your preferences. Try refreshing this page and updating them one more time. If you continue to get this message, reach out to us at customer-service@technologyreview.com with a list of newsletters you’d like to receive.