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Seven Must-Read Stories (Week Ending May 28, 2016)

Another chance to catch the most interesting, and important, articles from the previous week on MIT Technology Review.
May 31, 2016
  1. Sensing the Inevitable, Companies Begin to Adapt to Climate Change
    Most have yet to incorporate climate change into their business plans, but a few are finding a way.
  2. No Industry Can Afford to Ignore Artificial Intelligence
    MIT Technology Review’s EmTech Digital conference will explore and explain how artificial intelligence is transforming all kinds of business.
  3. Big Ideas, Big Conflicts in Plan to Synthesize a Human Genome
    Printing genomes on demand could mean custom-built organisms, difficult ethical questions, and profits for a handful of companies.
  4. Germany Runs Up Against the Limits of Renewables
    Even as Germany adds lots of wind and solar power to the electric grid, the country’s carbon emissions are rising. Will the rest of the world learn from its lesson?
  5. Tesla Tests Self-Driving Functions with Secret Updates to Its Customers’ Cars
    The Internet connection built into every Tesla gives the company a unique advantage in the race to develop autonomous vehicles.
  6. Washington Grapples with a Thorny Question: What Is a GMO Anyway?
    New approaches to generating crop varieties are making it hard for policymakers to know what to regulate.
  7. Google Has a Plan to Kill Off Passwords
    Passwords are annoying to remember and can be insecure, so Google is turning to a new form of authentication to protect our personal information.
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