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Seven Must-Read Stories (Week Ending April 30, 2016)

Another chance to catch the most interesting, and important, articles from the previous week on MIT Technology Review.
April 29, 2016
  1. Q&A: Bill Gates
    Microsoft’s cofounder vows to change the “supply side” for breakthrough energy technologies by investing billions of his and his friends’ dollars.
  2. China Is Building a Robot Army of Model Workers
    Can China reboot its manufacturing industry—and the global economy—by replacing millions of workers with machines?
  3. The Key to Repairing Your Bones May Come Out of a Printer
    Customized, printed orthopedic implants could be the future. In the meantime, the new manufacturing method is helping companies cut costs.
  4. Three Decades On, Chernobyl’s Specter Haunts Nuclear Power
    More nuclear plants could combat climate change, but safety concerns plague the industry—fairly or not.
  5. Do We Deserve Total Digital Privacy?
    A quarter-century ago, a “protracted battle” over encryption began between law enforcement and civil-rights activists.
  6. Nokia’s Move into Connected Gadgets May Prove Prescient
    Nokia is paying $191 million for Withings, a company that makes health and fitness gadgets, and it sounds like a smart move.
  7. Twitter’s Artificial Intelligence Knows What’s Happening in Live Video Clips
    Twitter has been developing technology that automatically recognizes what’s happening in live video, a step toward sophisticated recommendations.
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