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Witnessing Climate Change Everywhere

On an Instagram account called everydayclimatechange, the photographer James Whitlow Delano curates pictures that document causes and effects of global warming and responses to it.
December 22, 2015
Solar panels and passive solar heating systems on traditional homes in India.

 

Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, cloaked in smog from fires in forests that are being burned to clear land for agriculture.
Women biking near a coal-powered factory in China.
Smoggy view of Chongqing, China.
Workers on an oil-drilling platform off the Niger Delta in the Atlantic Ocean.
Residents of an atoll in Papua New Guinea using shells to rebuild a sea wall on an eroded beach.
A man from the Niger Delta prepares to board an oil rig in a protest.
A gold miner next to a sooty glacier in Peru.
Land being cleared with fire for farmers and ranchers in Brazil.
The Rio Negro, an Amazon tributary, at a record low level in Manaus, Brazil.
A coal ash disposal site in Inner Mongolia.
Wind turbines near monuments outside Jaisalmer, India.
A clear-cut rain forest in Sumatra.
A dump in Phnom Penh, Cambodia, where gas emitted by decomposing trash starts fires.
A flooded settlement in Brazil.

These photos are time-stamped according to when they were posted on Instagram, not when they were originally taken. 

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