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Seven Must-Read Stories (Week ending November 28, 2015)

Another chance to catch the most interesting and important articles from the previous week on MIT Technology Review.
  1. With This Genetic Engineering Technology, There’s No Turning Back
    Designers of a “selfish” gene able to spread among mosquitoes say it could wipe out malaria, but the scientific community is at odds over whether or not we should do it.
  2. Your Doctor Doesn’t Want to Hear About Your Fitness-Tracker Data
    Some patients are bringing troves of fitness-tracker data to their checkups, but the doctor might not find it all that helpful.
  3. At a Time of Plenty, Some Technologies Are Shut Out
    New funding methods claim to democratize investment in innovation, but important technologies still struggle.
  4. “Plant Lamps” Turn Dirt and Vegetation into a Power Source
    Researchers in Peru have a new way to capture electricity from plants and bacteria to help rainforest communities.
  5. This Gadget Can Tell What’s Wrong with Your Air Conditioner by Listening to It
    Augury’s gadget and iPhone app pay attention to ultrasonic sounds and vibrations to figure out what’s wrong with air conditioners and other big machines.
  6. Recommended Robot and AI Reads This Week
    A roundup of interesting stories on robotics and artificial intelligence from other sites, collected by Will Knight, MIT Technology Review’s senior editor for AI.
  7. 6 Ways Law Enforcement Can Track Terrorists in an Encrypted World
    Government officials want us to believe that encryption is helping terrorists, but law enforcement still has plenty of tools to get the data.
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Illustration by Rose WongIllustration by Rose Wong

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