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Google Seeks to Influence AI Research by Giving Software Away
The software Google developed and uses for artificial intelligence tasks such as understanding the content of images is now anyone’s to use or modify. Releasing the software as open source is expected to help researchers and smaller companies develop new applications for machine learning more quickly.

NSA Says How Often, Not When, It Discloses Software Flaws
The U.S. National Security Agency claims that it informs companies about flaws it has discovered in their software 90 percent of the time. Reuters reports that the agency often uses them to hack into the computers of its target first, though.

Automation Will Change Jobs More Than Kill Them
A new report from McKinsey suggests that less than 5 percent of jobs are at imminent risk of being taken over entirely by machines or software. But the authors say most jobs will be changed in some way by automation, because emerging technologies are capable of taking over some activities that workers’ currently perform, even in “high-skill” positions.

Let’s Look to Magicians to Better Understand Technological Deception
Technology that deceives can be bad, such as Volkswagen’s “defeat device” that dodged emissions tests. But one writer argues that helpful, well-designed technology often uses trickery, too, and we should get used to that.

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Conceptual illustration of a therapy session
Conceptual illustration of a therapy session

The therapists using AI to make therapy better

Researchers are learning more about how therapy works by examining the language therapists use with clients. It could lead to more people getting better, and staying better.

street in Kabul at night
street in Kabul at night

Can Afghanistan’s underground “sneakernet” survive the Taliban?

A once-thriving network of merchants selling digital content to people without internet connections is struggling under Taliban rule.

Conceptual illustration showing a file folder with the China flag and various papers flying out of it
Conceptual illustration showing a file folder with the China flag and various papers flying out of it

The US crackdown on Chinese economic espionage is a mess. We have the data to show it.

The US government’s China Initiative sought to protect national security. In the most comprehensive analysis of cases to date, MIT Technology Review reveals how far it has strayed from its goals.

IBM engineers at Ames Research Center
IBM engineers at Ames Research Center

Where computing might go next

The future of computing depends in part on how we reckon with its past.

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Illustration by Rose WongIllustration by Rose Wong

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