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Seven Must-Read Stories (Week ending October 24, 2015)

Another chance to catch the most interesting and important articles from the previous week on MIT Technology Review.
October 23, 2015
  1. Drivers Push Tesla’s Autopilot Beyond Its Abilities
    Tesla says its new Autopilot feature is not synonymous with autonomous driving, but some drivers are acting like it is.
  2. First Gene-Edited Dogs Reported in China
    An extra-muscular beagle has been created through genome engineering. Are we on our way to customizing the DNA of our pets?
  3. Twitter Boasts of What It Can Do with Your Data
    Twitter unveils initiatives aimed at making money from its users’ data and behavior.
  4. Why Self-Driving Cars Must Be Programmed to Kill
    Self-driving cars are already cruising the streets. But before they can become widespread, carmakers must solve an impossible ethical dilemma of algorithmic morality.
  5. Scientists Hope to Lengthen Dog Years
    A drug that helps people after organ transplants has extended the lives of fruit flies, worms, and mice. The next step is to see what it will do for our pets.
  6. TerraPower Quietly Explores New Nuclear Reactor Strategy
    The startup is exploring a molten chloride reactor concept, but says it remains committed to traveling wave reactors.
  7. You’ve Been Misled About What Makes a Good Password
    Common advice on how to make a strong password is misleading, according to a new study of password-guessing techniques.
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