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Seven Must-Read Stories (Week Ending June 27, 2015)

Another chance to catch the most interesting, and important, articles from the previous week on MIT Technology Review.
  1. 50 Smartest Companies 2015
    Massive solar panel factories. Fertility treatments. Friendly robots. Meet the companies reshaping the technology business.
  2. The Wait-for-Google-to-Do-It Strategy
    America’s communications ­infrastructure is finally getting some crucial upgrades because one company is forcing ­competition when regulators won’t.
  3. The Struggle for Accurate Measurements on Your Wrist
    Wearable devices are getting more advanced, but can today’s technology really measure our health?
  4. The Great Cancer Test Experiment
    New diagnostics can find the DNA that drives a tumor, but evidence that they help patients is missing.
  5. Exiting Stealth Mode, 24M Takes On the Battery Industry
    A startup from one of the A123 founders aims to overhaul the making of lithium-ion batteries–but it’s not the first to try.
  6. Nano Satellites Work with Ground Sensors to Offer New Eye on Disaster Relief and Agriculture
    A swarm of small satellites could give critical infrastructure an Internet connection that never goes down.
  7. Computers Are Getting a Dose of Common Sense
    A startup called MetaMind has developed a new, improved algorithm for processing language.
  8. <

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Illustration by Rose WongIllustration by Rose Wong

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