Skip to Content
Alumni profile

Elad Shoushan, MBA ’14

Entrepreneur brings test prep to mobile devices.

After five surgeries on one knee and two on the other, Elad Shoushan hung up his high-tops, leaving his Israeli professional basketball career for computer science. Now instead of making assists on the court, he helps students score more points on standardized tests. His company, LTG Exam Prep Platform, puts test prep on students’ smartphones and tablets. With $3.2 million in venture funding and 160,000 downloads, the ­Prep4GMAT app is number one in Apple app store search results for GMAT and MBA in the United States, India, and China.

Elad Shoushan, MBA ’14

After walking away from the court, he earned a bachelor’s degree at the Technion in Haifa in 2008. He worked first for Intel and then for GE Healthcare for three years, connecting radiology information systems with doctors’ cell phones. Traveling for GE inspired him to consider getting an MBA in the States, but he struggled with the admission test. “I’m a pretty good student, but the GMAT was a big challenge for me. It’s not aligned with how people think,” he says.

Shoushan applied to Sloan, and then he quit his job and spent six months coding a test-prep app in his basement. “It went live to market the first day I started at Sloan,” he says.

Algorithms in his patented methodology highlight keywords in test questions; LTG stands for “Label the GMAT.” Shoushan explains: “We have a tech engine that parses questions. Users click on a button—we call it an x-ray—and suddenly keywords are highlighted in many different colors, so you can see what the question is trying to test.” The app is free, but users will eventually be charged for additional questions, features, and services.

LTG has released Mandarin Chinese and English editions of the app. A network of 100 tutors is available to schedule free study sessions in English, Mandarin, and other languages. And the GMAT is only the beginning, Shoushan says: “The goal of LTG is to become the go-to test prep platform on mobile devices for all standardized tests.” The company released an SAT version in April; GRE, MCAT, and LSAT versions are also in the works.

Why did he bother with business school given that LTG was already launched when he got to Cambridge?

“At the end of the day, the exposure, the connections, and the brand name of MIT are invaluable,” he says. When LTG got its own office space, he threw a party to say good-bye to the staff at Sloan’s Martin Trust Center for MIT Entrepreneurship, where he had been toiling around the clock from September to May of his second year at Sloan. “It felt like they were our family,” he says. “The company would not have gotten to this stage without me being at Sloan.”

Shoushan and his wife, Shelly, live in Kendall Square.

Keep Reading

Most Popular

individual aging affects covid outcomes concept
individual aging affects covid outcomes concept

Anti-aging drugs are being tested as a way to treat covid

Drugs that rejuvenate our immune systems and make us biologically younger could help protect us from the disease’s worst effects.

Europe's AI Act concept
Europe's AI Act concept

A quick guide to the most important AI law you’ve never heard of

The European Union is planning new legislation aimed at curbing the worst harms associated with artificial intelligence.

Uber Autonomous Vehicles parked in a lot
Uber Autonomous Vehicles parked in a lot

It will soon be easy for self-driving cars to hide in plain sight. We shouldn’t let them.

If they ever hit our roads for real, other drivers need to know exactly what they are.

crypto winter concept
crypto winter concept

Crypto is weathering a bitter storm. Some still hold on for dear life.

When a cryptocurrency’s value is theoretical, what happens if people quit believing?

Stay connected

Illustration by Rose WongIllustration by Rose Wong

Get the latest updates from
MIT Technology Review

Discover special offers, top stories, upcoming events, and more.

Thank you for submitting your email!

Explore more newsletters

It looks like something went wrong.

We’re having trouble saving your preferences. Try refreshing this page and updating them one more time. If you continue to get this message, reach out to us at customer-service@technologyreview.com with a list of newsletters you’d like to receive.