Skip to Content
Seen on campus

A Symbol of Strength, a Place to Reflect

June 23, 2015

When Professor J. Meejin Yoon designed the memorial for Sean Collier, the MIT police officer killed in the line of duty in April 2013, she used granite—32 massive chunks of it—as a symbol of strength and a nod to the New Hampshire mountains that Collier liked to climb with the MIT Outing Club. Constructed using both historic stone-setting principles and robotic fabrication technologies, the 190-ton memorial forms the shape of an open hand to represent Collier’s service and generosity. Its five walls join at a central keystone, embodying strength through unity; the open space beneath it suggests his absence. Rob Rogers, one of Collier’s brothers, served as a project manager for the memorial’s construction, and a quotation from his eulogy is engraved along one granite wall: “Live long like he would. Big hearts, big smiles, big service, all love.”

Keep Reading

Most Popular

It’s time to retire the term “user”

The proliferation of AI means we need a new word.

Sam Altman says helpful agents are poised to become AI’s killer function

Open AI’s CEO says we won’t need new hardware or lots more training data to get there.

An AI startup made a hyperrealistic deepfake of me that’s so good it’s scary

Synthesia's new technology is impressive but raises big questions about a world where we increasingly can’t tell what’s real.

Taking AI to the next level in manufacturing

Reducing data, talent, and organizational barriers to achieve scale.

Stay connected

Illustration by Rose Wong

Get the latest updates from
MIT Technology Review

Discover special offers, top stories, upcoming events, and more.

Thank you for submitting your email!

Explore more newsletters

It looks like something went wrong.

We’re having trouble saving your preferences. Try refreshing this page and updating them one more time. If you continue to get this message, reach out to us at customer-service@technologyreview.com with a list of newsletters you’d like to receive.