Skip to Content

Seven Must-Read Stories (Week Ending March 21, 2015)

Another chance to catch the most interesting, and important, articles from the previous week on MIT Technology Review.
  1. Virtual Reality Advertisements Get in Your Face
    Some companies see virtual and augmented reality as a way to make money from a new type of ads.
  2. The Best Virtual-Reality Experience So Far
    Game developer Valve has been working on its own virtual-reality hardware—and it’s more impressive than anything else I’ve tried.
  3. Rewriting the Rules of Turing’s Imitation Game
    Some researchers are searching for more meaningful ways to measure artificial intelligence.
  4. Goodbye, Internet Explorer
    Microsoft’s legendary browser is getting replaced. It’s about time.
  5. Hybrid Power Could Help Drone Delivery Take Off
    A prototype hybrid quadcopter can fly several times farther than conventional battery-powered ones.
  6. High-Speed 3-D Printing
    A startup’s version of 3-D printing is faster and cheaper (and makes better objects).
  7. Scientists Call for a Summit on Gene-Edited Babies
    Nobel Prize winners raise alarm over genetic engineering of humans.
  8. <

Keep Reading

Most Popular

The Steiner tree problem:  Connect a set of points with line segments of minimum total length.
The Steiner tree problem:  Connect a set of points with line segments of minimum total length.

The 50-year-old problem that eludes theoretical computer science

A solution to P vs NP could unlock countless computational problems—or keep them forever out of reach.

section of Rima Sharp captured by the LRO
section of Rima Sharp captured by the LRO

The moon didn’t die as early as we thought

Samples from China’s lunar lander could change everything we know about the moon’s volcanic record.

conceptual illustration of a heart with an arrow going in on one side and a cursor coming out on the other
conceptual illustration of a heart with an arrow going in on one side and a cursor coming out on the other

Forget dating apps: Here’s how the net’s newest matchmakers help you find love

Fed up with apps, people looking for romance are finding inspiration on Twitter, TikTok—and even email newsletters.

ASML machine
ASML machine

Inside the machine that saved Moore’s Law

The Dutch firm ASML spent $9 billion and 17 years developing a way to keep making denser computer chips.

Stay connected

Illustration by Rose WongIllustration by Rose Wong

Get the latest updates from
MIT Technology Review

Discover special offers, top stories, upcoming events, and more.

Thank you for submitting your email!

Explore more newsletters

It looks like something went wrong.

We’re having trouble saving your preferences. Try refreshing this page and updating them one more time. If you continue to get this message, reach out to us at customer-service@technologyreview.com with a list of newsletters you’d like to receive.