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People Who Use Firefox or Chrome Are Better Employees
How awesome an employee are you? It depends on which Web browser you use.
Timothy Maher, managing editor

Cisco Posts Kit to Empty Houses to Dodge NSA Chop Shops
Cisco starts shipping equipment to vacant addresses so as to foil a U.S. National Security Agency program that intercepts equipment en route to customers to secretly install spying software.
Tom Simonite, San Francisco bureau chief

How Robots & Algorithms Are Taking Over
An interesting book review explores the idea that technology is eroding employment opportunities.
Will Knight, news and analysis editor

What Your Tweets Say About You
What big-data language analysis of tweets can and can’t tell us about the state of individual and community mental health.
—Kyanna Sutton, senior Web producer

UT Tyler Professor Launches Study Using Robots
A University of Texas research project on personal robots, like Paro, will be the biggest of its kind in the U.S.
—J. Juniper Friedman, associate Web producer

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The Steiner tree problem:  Connect a set of points with line segments of minimum total length.
The Steiner tree problem:  Connect a set of points with line segments of minimum total length.

The 50-year-old problem that eludes theoretical computer science

A solution to P vs NP could unlock countless computational problems—or keep them forever out of reach.

section of Rima Sharp captured by the LRO
section of Rima Sharp captured by the LRO

The moon didn’t die as early as we thought

Samples from China’s lunar lander could change everything we know about the moon’s volcanic record.

conceptual illustration of a heart with an arrow going in on one side and a cursor coming out on the other
conceptual illustration of a heart with an arrow going in on one side and a cursor coming out on the other

Forget dating apps: Here’s how the net’s newest matchmakers help you find love

Fed up with apps, people looking for romance are finding inspiration on Twitter, TikTok—and even email newsletters.

ASML machine
ASML machine

Inside the machine that saved Moore’s Law

The Dutch firm ASML spent $9 billion and 17 years developing a way to keep making denser computer chips.

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Illustration by Rose WongIllustration by Rose Wong

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