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The Definition of a Dictionary
Merriam-Webster considers a dictionary that lives only on the Web—a project that could give new meaning to the word “unabridged.”
—Linda Lowenthal, copy chief

How One Stupid Tweet Blew Up Justine Sacco’s Life
With social media, everyone can be infamous for 15 minutes. The New York Times checks in with some people whose minutes are up.
—Linda Lowenthal

Tough Old Birds
The solar-weather satellite SpaceX launched this week will replace one of many important but elderly satellites, as the Economist illustrates with a handy chart.
—Mike Orcutt, research editor

Why Do Many Reasonable People Doubt Science?
Not much new ground broken here, but it’s smart and well-written nonetheless.
Brian Bergstein, deputy editor

Me, Meet Virtual Me
Not just gamers are excited about advances in virtual reality: neuroscientists and psychologists say it can help treat post-traumatic stress disorder and make people more healthy.
Tom Simonite, San Francisco bureau chief

Photographer Imagines What It Looks Like to Run for Your Life
A New York photographer convinces 20 men to run as if their life depended on it.
—J. Juniper Friedman, associate Web producer

Why Google Glass Broke
Good backstory on Google Glass and why it flopped.
Antonio Regalado, senior editor, biomedicine

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