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Seven Must-Read Stories (Week Ending December 27, 2014)

Another chance to catch the most interesting, and important, articles from the previous week on MIT Technology Review.
  1. Singapore Wants a Driverless Version of Uber
    Singapore plans to let anyone test driverless cars in one of its busy neighborhoods in 2015.
  2. The Startup Meant to Reinvent What Bitcoin Can Do
    A company given $21 million by leading Silicon Valley investors aims to extend Bitcoin’s functionality so it can power much more than just payments.
  3. 2015 Could Be the Year of the Hospital Hack
    Health-care organizations often store medical records and other information insecurely.
  4. Cuba’s Internet Revolution Faces Economic and Political Realities
    The new White House approach could help Cubans gain access to the Internet—but the question is whether the regime will play ball.
  5. “Smart” Software Can Be Tricked Into Seeing What Isn’t There
    Humans and software see some images differently, pointing out shortcomings of recent breakthroughs in machine learning.
  6. A Prototype Battery Could Double the Range of Electric Cars
    Startup Seeo has developed batteries that store far more energy than conventional ones, which could extend the range of electric cars.
  7. Best of 2014: Forget the Shortest Route Across a City; New Algorithm Finds the Most Beautiful
    If you prefer beautiful routes over short ones, GPS mapping algorithms are of little use. But In July, Yahoo researchers came up with an approach that could change that.
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