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Seven Must-Read Stories (Week Ending November 29, 2014)

Another chance to catch the most interesting, and important, articles from the previous week on MIT Technology Review.
  1. Google Glass Is Dead; Long Live Smart Glasses
    Even though Google’s head-worn computer is going nowhere, the technology is sure to march on.
  2. Are Telepathy Experiments Stunts or Science?
    Scientists have established direct communication between two human brains, but is it more than a stunt?
  3. Simple Circuit Could Double Cell-Phone Data Speeds
    A circuit that lets a radio send and receive data simultaneously over the same frequency could supercharge wireless data transfer.
  4. Three Questions with Slack’s CEO
    Slack wants to be an open, searchable home for all your work communication.
  5. Why Apple Failed to Make Sapphire iPhones
    The delicate, monthlong process of growing sapphire accounts for why Apple’s sapphire supplier failed to deliver for the iPhone 6.
  6. Water-Repellent Coating Could Make Power Plants Greener
    A startup has created a water-repellent coating that could significantly increase power plants’ efficiency.
  7. Steve Jobs Lives on at the Patent Office
    Years after his death, the former Apple CEO still wins more patents than most.
  8. <

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