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Seven Must-Read Stories (Week Ending November 8, 2014)

Another chance to catch the most interesting, and important, articles from the previous week on MIT Technology Review.
  1. Does Watson Know the Answer to IBM’s Woes?
    IBM is betting that research on more human-like artificial intelligence will help it turn things around.
  2. With $100 Million, Entrepreneur Sees Path to Disrupt Medical Imaging
    Will ultrasound-on-a-chip make medical imaging so cheap that anyone can do it?
  3. Google’s Half-Finished Attempt to Take Over the Living Room
    Google’s Nexus Player should appeal to those who want smarter TVs. But it will need to do much more to be the hub of all home entertainment.
  4. A Brain-Inspired Chip Takes to the Sky
    An experiment involving a chip on a small drone shows how hardware modeled on the brain could provide useful intelligence
  5. “Dark Web” Version of Facebook Shows a New Way to Secure the Web
    A new way to access Facebook securely and anonymously via the “dark Web” could provide a model for other sites.
  6. Climate Panel Issues Dire Report as Renewables Make Little Impact
    Latest synthesis report from U.N. panel says we’ve already emitted half the permissible greenhouse gases if we wish to avoid the worst.
  7. Google Wants to Store Your Genome
    For $25 a year, Google will keep a copy of any genome in the cloud.
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