Skip to Content

Israel, Gaza, War & Data
An important piece by network scientist Gilad Lotan on the way social recommendation algorithms can distort our experience of polarizing news coverage.
Will Knight, news and analysis editor

The Next Great Light Bulb
Light bulbs aren’t just a symbol for innovation; they’re also still a product of innovation.
Brian Bergstein, deputy editor

The 2014 Survey: Impacts of AI and Robotics by 2025
“There’s no … law that says jobs eliminated by new tech will inevitably be replaced by new jobs in new markets.”
Jason Pontin, editor in chief and publisher

Finally, Virtual Reality Let Me Fly like a Bird
How the childhood dream of being able to fly could come (virtually) true via Oculus Rift and a full-body device called Birdly.
Mike Orcutt, research editor

The New York Times, Tuesday, August 7, 1945
Hiroshima anniversary: 69 years ago today, a single bomb annihilated much of Hiroshima and changed the world forever.
Antonio Regalado, senior editor, business

Don’t Let the Disruption Hype Fool You: America Is Actually Getting Less Entrepreneurial
“People are starting fewer new businesses, and older businesses are doing better than their younger competitors.”
—Antonio Regalado

Visual Microphone Can Pick Up Speech from a Bag of Potato Chips and
How to Translate Sight Into Sound? It’s All in the Vibrations
A bag of chips has potentially become more hazardous (and not to your health).
—J. Juniper Friedman, associate web producer

Eight Smart Ways to Strengthen Your Password
Quick tips for making all your passwords hacker-proof.
—Kyanna Sutton, senior Web producer

Keep Reading

Most Popular

This startup wants to copy you into an embryo for organ harvesting

With plans to create realistic synthetic embryos, grown in jars, Renewal Bio is on a journey to the horizon of science and ethics.

VR is as good as psychedelics at helping people reach transcendence

On key metrics, a VR experience elicited a response indistinguishable from subjects who took medium doses of LSD or magic mushrooms.

This nanoparticle could be the key to a universal covid vaccine

Ending the covid pandemic might well require a vaccine that protects against any new strains. Researchers may have found a strategy that will work.

Stay connected

Illustration by Rose Wong

Get the latest updates from
MIT Technology Review

Discover special offers, top stories, upcoming events, and more.

Thank you for submitting your email!

Explore more newsletters

It looks like something went wrong.

We’re having trouble saving your preferences. Try refreshing this page and updating them one more time. If you continue to get this message, reach out to us at customer-service@technologyreview.com with a list of newsletters you’d like to receive.