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Seven Must-Read Stories (Week Ending June 28, 2014)

Another chance to catch the most interesting, and important, articles from the previous week on MIT Technology Review.
  1. Searching for the “Free Will” Neuron
    Gabriel Kreiman’s single-neuron measurements of unconscious decision-making may not topple Descartes, but they could someday point to ways we can learn to control ourselves.
  2. Sharp Demonstrates Ultra-Efficient Solar Cells
    New technology could be twice as efficient at converting sunlight to electricity.
  3. The Thought Experiment
    In a remarkable study, a paralyzed woman used her mind to control a robotic arm. If only there were a realistic way to get this technology out of the lab and into real life.
  4. Three Questions with Amazon’s Technology Chief, Werner Vogels
    Amazon CTO Werner Vogels on how cloud computing is changing.
  5. How to Make Smart Watches Not Worth Stealing
    A prototype device shows that measuring electrical resistance of tissues within the wrist could reliably identify someone.
  6. Malware on the Move
    As mobile devices are used to perform more financial transactions, cybercriminals are taking greater interest.
  7. Google Announces Sub-$100 Smartphone
    A new line of smartphones designed by Google could spread Internet access more widely in poor regions of the world.
  8. <

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still from Embodied Intelligence video
still from Embodied Intelligence video

These weird virtual creatures evolve their bodies to solve problems

They show how intelligence and body plans are closely linked—and could unlock AI for robots.

conceptual illustration showing various women&#039;s faces being scanned
conceptual illustration showing various women&#039;s faces being scanned

A horrifying new AI app swaps women into porn videos with a click

Deepfake researchers have long feared the day this would arrive.

protein structures
protein structures

DeepMind says it will release the structure of every protein known to science

The company has already used its protein-folding AI, AlphaFold, to generate structures for the human proteome, as well as yeast, fruit flies, mice, and more.

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Illustration by Rose WongIllustration by Rose Wong

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