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The Inside Story of Oculus Rift and How Virtual Reality Became Reality
How Oculus Rift revived the dream of virtual reality.
Tom Simonite, senior editor, IT

It’s Official: Climate Change Is Now More Divisive Than Abortion
A survey of New Hampshire voters suggests that Democrats and Republicans now disagree more about whether humans are contributing to global climate change than about any other issue.
—Linda Lowenthal, copy chief

Police, Pedestrians, and the Social Ballet of Merging
John Leonard, a professor at MIT, shoots situations around Boston and Cambridge that could confound self-driving cars. Worryingly, I recognize several from my daily commute.
Will Knight, news and analysis editor

Scalpers Inc.
A nice review of Michael Lewis’s book about high-frequency trading, which I also highly recommend.
—Will Knight

Q&A: Google Self-Driving Car Head Chris Urmson on Building a Car From Scratch
This Q&A gives good insight into the potential (and arguably inevitable) mass product appeal of one of Google’s “moonshot” spinoff businesses.
—Kyanna Sutton, senior Web producer

Who’s Behind That Tweet? Here’s How 7 News Orgs Manage Their Twitter and Facebook Accounts
Social media producers at various news outlets argue why promotional posts on social media platforms need to be crafted by a human, not a bot, to garner optimal click-throughs.
—Kyanna Sutton

The Story of One Whale Who Tried to Bridge the Linguistic Divide Between Animals and Humans
Next time I go swimming, I would like to talk to whales.
—J. Juniper Friedman, editorial assistant

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