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Seven Must-Read Stories (Week Ending May 3, 2014)

Another chance to catch the most interesting, and important, articles from the previous week on MIT Technology Review.
  1. Implant Lets Patients Regrow Lost Leg Muscle
    A new surgical procedure could help people suffering from debilitating wounds.
  2. Stem Cells from a Diabetes Patient
    Researchers hope stem cells could one day treat chronic conditions like diabetes and Parkinson’s disease.
  3. Where’s the Next Heartbleed Bug Lurking?
    OpenSSL, which the Internet depends upon, has a single full-time employee dedicated to keeping the software secure. Other projects are similarly understaffed.
  4. Agricultural Drones
    Relatively cheap drones with advanced sensors and imaging capabilities are giving farmers new ways to increase yields and reduce crop damage.
  5. Startups Experiment with Ads That Know How You Drive
    A mobile ad company plans to offer deals based on data collected from in-car apps.
  6. Neuromorphic Chips
    Microprocessors configured more like brains than traditional chips could soon make computers far more astute about what’s going on around them.
  7. Liquid Metal Used to Reconnect Severed Nerves
    Chinese biomedical engineers have used liquid metal to transmit electrical signals across the gap in severed sciatic nerves. The work raises the prospect of a new treatment for nerve injuries, they say.
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