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Seven Must-Read Stories (Week Ending March 28, 2014)

Another chance to catch the most interesting, and important, articles from the previous week on MIT Technology Review.
  1. Lens-Free Camera Sees Things Differently
    An itty-bitty camera could bring sight to the Internet of things.
  2. New Approach Could Stop Websites from Leaking or Stealing Your Data
    A system called Mylar makes it possible to build online services that can never decrypt or leak your data.
  3. What Zuckerberg Sees in Oculus Rift
    Facebook acquired Oculus Rift because it believes virtual reality could be the next big thing after mobile.
  4. Academics Spy Weaknesses in Bitcoin’s Foundations
    Game theory suggests the rules governing Bitcoin may need to be updated if the currency is to endure.
  5. Coming Soon: Android Apps for Wearable Devices
    Developers and designers are now building apps for Google’s smart watch platform.
  6. How Advanced Mobile Networks Could Power Themselves
    Cellular networks guzzle electricity and diesel fuel, but researchers are showing how new versions could be cleaner but still reliable.
  7. The Curious Nature of Sharing Cascades on Facebook
    Most content on Facebook is shared a few times but some can be shared millions of times. Now computer scientists are beginning to understand the difference.
  8. <

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