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Seven Must-Read Stories (Week Ending February 7, 2014)

Another chance to catch the most interesting, and important, articles from the previous week on MIT Technology Review.
  1. A Robotic Hand, This Time with Feeling
    A man with a robotic hand can now feel varying degrees of pressure thanks to an implant that connects with the nerves in his arm.
  2. Burning the U.K.’s Plutonium Stockpile Could Fast-Track New Reactors
    GE’s nuclear waste-burning PRISM reactors get a new chance at commercialization.
  3. Does Bill Gates Still Know What Computer Users Want?
    Microsoft’s new CEO, Satya Nadella, will work with Bill Gates to define new products.
  4. Why Google Kept Motorola’s Research Lab
    Motorola Mobility’s sale to Lenovo only looks like a loss—the patents were cheap, and Google might yet advance wearables, home devices, and modular phone hardware.
  5. Solar Thermal Technology Poses Challenges for Drought-Stricken California
    Reducing water consumption at solar thermal plants raises costs and decreases power production.
  6. Quantum Internet: First Teleportation to a Solid-State Quantum Memory
    A European team of physicists has demonstrated a device that can teleport quantum information to a solid-state quantum memory over telecom fiber, a crucial capability for any future quantum Internet.
  7. Why the Promise of Cheap Fuel from Super Bugs Fell Short
    The sell-off of synthetic biology pioneer LS9 goes to show that making biofuels from genetically engineered microbes has yet to deliver economically.
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