Skip to Content

Seven Must-Read Stories (Week Ending November 29, 2013)

Another chance to catch the most interesting, and important, articles from the previous week on MIT Technology Review.
  1. Printing Batteries
    New inks and tools allow 3-D printing of lithium-ion technology.
  2. Software Mines Science Papers to Make New Discoveries
    Software digests thousands of research papers to accurately identify proteins that could be productive targets for new cancer drugs.
  3. Are Electric Vehicles a Fire Hazard?
    Lithium-ion batteries have risks, but they can be managed to prevent fires in EVs.
  4. Fitness Trackers Still Need to Work Out Kinks
    The latest fitness-tracking wristbands need to get in better shape before they’ll earn a spot on my wrist.
  5. Quantum Light Harvesting Hints at Entirely New Form of Computing
    Light harvesting in plants and bacteria cannot be properly explained by classical processes or by quantum ones. Now complexity theorists say the answer is a delicate interplay of both, an idea that could transform computation.
  6. Online Anonymity in a Box, for $49
    A cheap device called the Safeplug makes it easy to use the Tor anonymity network at home.
  7. The Internet of Things, Unplugged and Untethered
    A startup called Iotera wants to let you track your pets, your kids, or your belongings without relying on commercial wireless networks.
  8. <

Keep Reading

Most Popular

conceptual illustration showing various women&#039;s faces being scanned
conceptual illustration showing various women&#039;s faces being scanned

A horrifying new AI app swaps women into porn videos with a click

Deepfake researchers have long feared the day this would arrive.

2021 tech fails concept
2021 tech fails concept

The worst technology of 2021

Face filters, billionaires in space, and home-buying algorithms that overpay all made our annual list of technology gone wrong.

glacier near Brown Station
glacier near Brown Station

The radical intervention that might save the “doomsday” glacier

Researchers are exploring whether building massive berms or unfurling underwater curtains could hold back the warm waters degrading ice sheets.

Professor Gang Chen of MIT
Professor Gang Chen of MIT

In a further blow to the China Initiative, prosecutors move to dismiss a high-profile case

MIT professor Gang Chen was one of the most prominent scientists charged under the China Initiative, a Justice Department effort meant to counter economic espionage and national security threats.

Stay connected

Illustration by Rose WongIllustration by Rose Wong

Get the latest updates from
MIT Technology Review

Discover special offers, top stories, upcoming events, and more.

Thank you for submitting your email!

Explore more newsletters

It looks like something went wrong.

We’re having trouble saving your preferences. Try refreshing this page and updating them one more time. If you continue to get this message, reach out to us at customer-service@technologyreview.com with a list of newsletters you’d like to receive.