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Seven Must-Read Stories (Week Ending November 29, 2013)

Another chance to catch the most interesting, and important, articles from the previous week on MIT Technology Review.
  1. Printing Batteries
    New inks and tools allow 3-D printing of lithium-ion technology.
  2. Software Mines Science Papers to Make New Discoveries
    Software digests thousands of research papers to accurately identify proteins that could be productive targets for new cancer drugs.
  3. Are Electric Vehicles a Fire Hazard?
    Lithium-ion batteries have risks, but they can be managed to prevent fires in EVs.
  4. Fitness Trackers Still Need to Work Out Kinks
    The latest fitness-tracking wristbands need to get in better shape before they’ll earn a spot on my wrist.
  5. Quantum Light Harvesting Hints at Entirely New Form of Computing
    Light harvesting in plants and bacteria cannot be properly explained by classical processes or by quantum ones. Now complexity theorists say the answer is a delicate interplay of both, an idea that could transform computation.
  6. Online Anonymity in a Box, for $49
    A cheap device called the Safeplug makes it easy to use the Tor anonymity network at home.
  7. The Internet of Things, Unplugged and Untethered
    A startup called Iotera wants to let you track your pets, your kids, or your belongings without relying on commercial wireless networks.
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open sourcing language models concept

Meta has built a massive new language AI—and it’s giving it away for free

Facebook’s parent company is inviting researchers to pore over and pick apart the flaws in its version of GPT-3

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The gene-edited pig heart given to a dying patient was infected with a pig virus

The first transplant of a genetically-modified pig heart into a human may have ended prematurely because of a well-known—and avoidable—risk.

Muhammad bin Salman funds anti-aging research
Muhammad bin Salman funds anti-aging research

Saudi Arabia plans to spend $1 billion a year discovering treatments to slow aging

The oil kingdom fears that its population is aging at an accelerated rate and hopes to test drugs to reverse the problem. First up might be the diabetes drug metformin.

Yann LeCun
Yann LeCun

Yann LeCun has a bold new vision for the future of AI

One of the godfathers of deep learning pulls together old ideas to sketch out a fresh path for AI, but raises as many questions as he answers.

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Illustration by Rose WongIllustration by Rose Wong

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