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Seven Must-Read Stories (Week Ending November 15, 2013)

Another chance to catch the most interesting, and important, articles from the previous week on MIT Technology Review.
  1. A New Solar Material Shows Its Potential
    A material described in Nature could help lead the way to high-efficiency, inexpensive solar cells.
  2. Stores Sniff Out Smartphones to Follow Shoppers
    Indoor location technology brings Internet-style tracking to physical spaces.
  3. Lurking Inside the iPad Is the Future of High-Def Displays
    The appearance of indium gallium zinc oxide transistors in iPads shows that the display industry is poised to begin churning out a new breed of high-performance screens.
  4. Graphene Supercapacitors Ready for Electric Vehicle Energy Storage, Say Korean Engineers
    Conventional batteries take so long to charge that they cannot efficiently store braking energy. Graphene supercapacitors store almost as much but charge in just 16 seconds.
  5. Jawbone’s New Wristband Adds You to the Internet of Things
    Jawbone’s new activity-tracking wristband can be used to start your coffeemaker when you get up.
  6. Genomics Could Blow Up the Clinical Trial
    Genomic technology could accelerate patient trials of new cancer drugs that are targeted to a tumor’s individual molecular profile.
  7. Three Questions for Computing Pioneer Carver Mead
    Carver Mead christened Moore’s Law and helped make it come true. Now he says engineers should experiment with quantum mechanics to advance computing.
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