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Google Glass as a Hands-Free Instruction Manual

A new app for Google’s head-mounted computer helps beginners with car maintenance
September 17, 2013

Editor’s note: Metaio took down the video embedded in this post overnight. It showed a driver receiving directions like “Open the hood” and animated graphics directing her towards the washer fluid cap through the Google Glass display.

For all Google’s talk about the disruptive potential of its wearable computer Google Glass, the use cases the company has shown are mostly familiar: taking and sharing photos, looking up information, or receiving and responding to messages. Augmented reality company Metaio just released video of an idea that seems to make more use of the form of Google Glass.

In the clip, a woman receives directions on how to refill her car’s washer fluid from a Google Glass app. This isn’t the first time a wearable display has been used for such purposes (see “Faster Maintenance with Augmented Reality”), but It’s a good example of a situation where being able to see a display while having your hands free could be very valuable.

We’ve noted before that some of the greatest enthusiasm for Glass comes from people with ideas for similar specialized - and often commercial - uses for it, such as for doctors or people repairing buildings (see “A Killer App for Google Glass”). When Google makes Glass available for sale next year, it looks set to appear in a wider range of places than the usual consumer gadget.

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Illustration by Rose Wong

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