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Profiles in generosity

Joel and Alice Schindall

Arlington, Massachusetts
August 21, 2013

Joel earned a bachelor’s in 1963, a master’s in 1964, and a PhD in 1967, all in electrical engineering, and joined the MIT faculty in 2002 after a 35-year career in the defense, aerospace, and telecommunications industries. His research accomplishments include inventing and developing technology to improve energy storage in electric and hybrid vehicles. He is the Bernard Gordon Professor of Product Development in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and also serves as co-director of the Bernard M. Gordon–MIT Engineering Leadership Program. He enjoyed biking, running, and discussing philosophy “until I got wrapped up in this program,” he says. “Now I get much of my satisfaction from my work.”

Joel and Alice Schindall

“Establishing a unitrust that’s invested in the MIT endow-ment is a no-brainer. It makes sense to put money into a vehicle that gets it out of our estate, allows a significant tax deduction, and gives me and my wife an annual income. The MIT endowment has an excellent track record; I’m amazed how well it performed even in difficult economic environments. The trust is also managed by the best investment management company I’m aware of … and it’s a compelling opportunity to give to MIT without paying high fees. We preferred a unitrust over an outright gift because we can make sure we have the financial resources we need, while eventually passing on a significant legacy to MIT. We earmarked much of the gift to the Bernard M. Gordon–MIT Engineering Leadership Program, because it prepares graduates to go into industry not only with the technical background but also the character and leadership ability to solve the world’s biggest problems.”

Please consider your own gift to MIT.
For information, contact Judy Sager: 617-253-6463; jsager@mit.edu.
Or visit: giving.mit.edu/ways/invest-endowment.

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